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In 2015, PAR celebrated its 75th Anniversary.  Over the years, PAR has risen to the top as the preeminent journal in public administration. As part of that rich history, PAR published the 75 most influential PAR articles that have advanced the field of public administration. You can find these articles on the PAR website at
www.publicadministrationreview.org.

PAR PODCAST

 

PAR Podcast
The Job of Government: Interweaving Public Functions and Private Hands
Donald F. Kettl (University of Maryland) discusses his article titled “The Job of Government: Interweaving Public Functions and Private Hands.” This article is currently available in Public Administration Review Issue 75, Volume 2.
Link to PAR Podcast.

PAR Podcast
Does Twitter Increase Perceived Police Legitimacy?
Stephan Grimmelikhuijsen (Utrecht School of Governance) discusses his article co-authored with Albert J. Meijer (Utrecht School of Governance) titled “Does Twitter Increase Perceived Police Legitimacy?” This article is currently available on Early View and will be printed in Public Administration Review, Issue 75, Volume 4.
Link to PAR Podcast.

PAR Podcast
Serving Clients When the Server Crashes: How Frontline Workers Cope with E-Government Challenges
Philip Rocco (University of California, Berkeley) discusses his article co-authored with Lars Tummers (Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands) titled “Serving Clients When the Server Crashes: How Frontline Workers Cope with E-Government Challenges.” This article is currently available on Early View and will be printed in Public Administration Review, Issue 75, Volume 5.
Link to PAR Podcast.


PAR FLASHBACK - 2013
This edition of PAR Preview calls attention to select articles in PAR over the past few years. It provides brief summaries of content now available digitally in Wiley's Online Library.

Research Articles

Understanding the Complex Dynamics of Transparency
 
Albert Meijer (Utrecht University, The Netherlands) contributes to the growing body of literature on government transparency by developing a model for studying the construction of transparency in interactions between governments and stakeholders. Building on theories about complex decision making, a heuristic model is developed that consists of a strategic, a cognitive, and an institutional perspective. To test the model's value, it is applied to two empirical cases: Dutch schools and the Council of the European Union. Applying the model to the school case provides insights into the connection between the introduction of transparency and the transformation in arrangements for safeguarding school quality. The case of the Council of the European Union highlights the role of transparency in the transformation of the council from a supranational to an intergovernmental body. The article concludes that the heuristic model, together with in-depth, longitudinal case studies, helps us understand government transparency in relation to broader transformations in the public sector. Link to PAR Online Article

The Effect of Transparency on Trust in Government: A Cross-National Comparative Experiment
 
Transparency is considered a key value for trustworthy governments. However, the effect of transparency on citizens’ trust across national cultures is overlooked in current research. Stephan Grimmelikhuijsen (Utrecht University, The Netherlands), Gregory Porumbescu (Myongji University, South Korea), Boram Hong, and Tobin Im (Seoul National University, South Korea) compare the effect of transparency on trust in government in the Netherlands and South Korea. The effect is investigated in two similar series of three experiments. The authors hypothesize that the effect of transparency differs because the countries have different cultural values regarding power distance and short- and long-term orientation. Results reveal similar patterns in both countries: transparency has a subdued and sometimes negative effect on trust in government. However, the negative effect in South Korea is much stronger. The difference in the magnitude of transparency's effect suggests that national cultural values play a significant role in how people perceive and appreciate government transparency. Link to PAR Online Article.