2020 Archived Programs

Programs are listed in reverse order, from most recent to least. Professional development programs and BookTalks are listed together throughout the below catalog.

Please use the password Impact2020 to access the below recordings through ASPA's Vimeo account.

BookTalk: How East Asia Has Managed to Control the Coronavirus: The Case of Mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea

December 14, 2020
Anthony B. L. Chueng, Research Chair Professor, Education University of Hong Kong
Dohyeong Kim, Discussant, Chair, Korean Section on Public Administration, ASPA
Pan Suk Kim, Presenter and Moderator, International Director, ASPA and Professor, Yonsei University
Kim Moloney, Discussant, Chair, Section on International & Comparative Administration, ASPA
Akira Nakamura, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Meiji University
Kendra Stewart, Introductions, President, ASPA and Professor, College of Charleston
Alfred Muluan Wu, Discussant, Chair, Chinese Section on Public Administration, ASPA
Lan Xue, Distinguished Professor, Dean, Tsinghua University

How has the coronavirus been handled across East Asia? The need to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic has created great challenges for national and local governments around the world. In the face of the new health crisis COVID has caused, some countries have responded relatively well, having a low number of infections and fatalities, while some countries are showing a relatively high number of both. We know that East Asian countries are responding relatively well in comparison with other regions, therefore, focusing on major cases in East Asia (mainland China, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea), we will look at crisis response leadership, crisis response governance and major response measures related to the coronavirus health crisis in a comparative administration perspective.


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BookTalk: Why Research Methods Matter: Essential Skills for Decision Making

December 9, 2020
RaJade M. Berry-James, Associate Professor of Public Administration, School of Public and International Affairs, NC State University
Susan T. Gooden, Dean and Professor, L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University

Each semester, many public administration students take courses in research methods and vow they never intend to use programs such as SPSS and SAS in their professional careers. So, they reasonably want to know why they are required to take a methods course. This book addresses this question by linking the tools of research methods to the importance of managerial decisionmaking. It provides a concise resource of practical applications of why research methods are important for public administrators, who do not routinely perform data analysis, but often find themselves having to evaluate and make important decisions based on data analysis and evaluative reports they receive. Research methods are central to the execution of good government and solid public-sector decisionmaking.


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KeepingCurrent: The 2020 Census: A Question of Quality and Integrity

December 1, 2020
Benjamin Chevat, Executive Director, 911 Health Watch Inc. and Citizens for the Extension of the James Zadroga Act Inc.
Nancy Potok, Former Chief Statistician of the United States
Antoinette Samuel, Moderator, Retired

Executing the U.S. Census properly is essential to our democracy, therefore the activities related to the collection, processing and dissemination (the CPD) are critical. These actions must be timely, reliable and valid. Do we have these for the 2020 Census? This webinar looked to answer this question, as well as explore the current status of each stage (collection, processing and dissemination), and the challenges, solutions and outcomes associate with each.


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BookTalk: Measuring Social Change: From a Niche to an Ecosystem Strategy

November 17, 2020
Elnoor Ebrahim, Professor of Management, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and Tisch College of Civic Life, Tufts University
Scott Schenkelberg, CEO, Miriam's Kitchen

How do you measure progress toward worthy goals like ending homelessness, responding to health emergencies or advancing human rights? What results can nonprofits and social enterprises reasonably measure and for which can they legitimately take credit? How can measurement be used strategically so it is useful for decisionmaking? These questions are at the heart of Ebrahim’s book. Join him and Scott Schenkelberg, CEO of Miriam’s Kitchen—an organization working to end homelessness—for a lively discussion on measuring what matters.


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BookTalk: Solved. How Other Countries Cracked the World’s Biggest Problems (and we can too!)

November 12, 2020
Bill Shields, Jr., Moderator, Executive Director, ASPA
Andrew Wear, Australian Public Servant

As the coronavirus pandemic rages on, there’s been a great deal of confusion about exactly what's going on nationwide and in individual states. Comparisons between states can be unwieldy, and solid understanding of trend lines is rare. Underlying this issue is a combination of unavailable, flawed, out-of-date or simply inaccurate data. All these issues stand in the way of public health solutions. This top notch panel explored the ways in which clear, rich data may be one of the most important medicines for this virulent disease.


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KeepingCurrent: COVID-19 - Do We Really Know What’s Going On?

In Partnership with the Center for Accountability and Performance
November 10, 2020
Robert Anderson, Chief, Mortality Statistics Branch, CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics
Richard Greene, Chair, Center for Accountability and Performance and Principal, Barrett and Greene
Justin Hart, Co-Founder, Rational Ground
Cooper Martin, Director of Sustainability and Solutions, Center for City Solutions, National League of Cities

As the coronavirus pandemic rages on, there’s been a great deal of confusion about exactly what's going on nationwide and in individual states. Comparisons between states can be unwieldy, and solid understanding of trend lines is rare. Underlying this issue is a combination of unavailable, flawed, out-of-date or simply inaccurate data. All these issues stand in the way of public health solutions. This top notch panel explored the ways in which clear, rich data may be one of the most important medicines for this virulent disease.


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KeepingCurrent: How the District of Columbia has Become a National Leader in Asset Management

November 5, 2020
David Clark, District of Columbia Government
Richard Dietz, District of Columbia Government
Shayne Kavanagh, Research Manager, Government Finance Officers Association
Darryl Street, District of Columbia Government

The municipal government of the District of Columbia is a recognized leader in asset management and infrastructure renewal planning. Those who attended this webinar learned about the District’s approach through the lens of GFOA’s Financial Foundations for Thriving Communities. The Financial Foundations Framework applies Elinor Ostrom’s Nobel Prize winning common pool resource theory to public finance. It shows the leadership strategies and institutional designs needed for a strong financial foundation. By using this lens, we hope to make it easier for local governments to not just replicate the technical aspects of what the District has done but also invent approaches to asset management that best fit local conditions. Success at asset management does not require copying all of the technical details of the District’s approach, but it does require that certain pillars leadership and institutional design be put in place.


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KeepingCurrent: City of Miramar CARE Program: Identifying and Implementing Initiatives for Revenue Generation and Cost Savings (And How You Can Too!)

October 28, 2020
T. C. Adderly, CARE Manager, Office of the City Manager, City of Miramar
Elsi Rose, LEED AP, Sustainability Manager, City of Miramar
Kelvin Lewis, CARE Assistant, Office of the City Manager, City of Miramar
Yenisey Toledo, Account Manager, Financial Services Department, City of Miramar

When working together as one unit, any public governmental entity or private sector business or institution may develop a Comprehensive Assessment of Revenues & Expenses (CARE) program to maximize cost efficiency within their respective workplace. Implemented in November 2018, under the guidance of City Manager Vernon Hargray, Miramar's CARE program is an internationally proven program that encourages participation by all employees, residents and businesses in the community in the innovative advancement of the City’s strategic planning, goal setting and implementation of viable ideas. The two main and immediate objectives of the program are a) to identify and improve on areas of inefficiency within the city and b) to recognize areas of potential revenue-generation for the city's financial growth. Listen to this webinar to learn more!


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BookTalk: Trump, the Administrative Presidency, and Federalism

October 15, 2020
Barry Rabe, J. Ira and Nicki Harris Family Professor of Public Policy, University of Michigan
Frank Thompson, Board of Governors Distinguished Professor, Rutgers University-SPAA
Kenneth Wong, Walter and Leonore Annenberg Chair for Education Policy, Brown University

Major discretion over who gets what from government has increasingly shifted to public administrators. In turn, presidents have often moved to shape the exercise of that discretion. This book places the Trump administrative presidency against the backdrop of those pursued by his predecessors dating back to Ronald Reagan. it zeroes in on the Trump administration’s executive initiatives in health care, climate and education. At times, the Trump initiatives mirrored those of prior presidents, but in other instances they were unprecedented in seeking to reshape federal programs. The book documents how the forces of federalism in combination with the courts have frequently (though not invariably) thwarted the Trump administrative presidency. The findings suggest a continuing movement away from models of intergovernmental administration rooted in cooperative federalism toward more conflictual models with a partisan flavor. The findings also have implications for the nexus between public administration and democracy.


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The Post-Pandemic Economic Transition

October 14, 2020
Richard Greene, Moderator, Barrett and Greene, Inc.
Amy Liu, Brookings Institution
Don Kettl, University of Texas
Michael Pagano, UIC Government Finance Research Center
Mark Zandi, Moody's Analytics

Though the pandemic is likely to dissipate at some point in the foreseeable future, experts agree that the economy will continue to suffer for years thereafter. This session, co-sponsored by the Government Finance Research Center at the University of Illinois Chicago, included an all-star array of panelists who focused on that transitional period between the eradication of the disease and the full rehabilitation of the economy. What challenges will states and localities deal with in that interim period? What solutions can be conjured to those challenges that are anticipated now?


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Homelessness in Houston Pre- and Post-COVID-19

October 8, 2020
Antoinette Christophe, Introductions, President, ASPA Greater Houston Chapter
Lynnette Howe, Moderator, Quality Assurance/Quality Control Manager, City of Houston Public Works and President-Elect, Greater Houston Chapter, ASPA
Tracey Parker. Executive Account Manager/General Lines P&C LSP & Victim of Homelessness
Ana Rausch, Vice President, Program Operations, Coalition for the Homeless in Houston and Harris County
Carl Salazar, Independent Consultant, Nonprofit Industry Founder & Executive Director, Expedition Balance

Homelessness is a rampant problem in many of our nation's cities and has only gotten worse during the COVID-19 pandemic. ASPA's Greater Houston Chapter provided a closer look at this critical situation and the various public and nonprofit entities at work on behalf of this vulnerable population.


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How American Elections Work: Preparing the Public to Understand Election Administration in the 2020 Presidential Election

October 5, 2020
Mitchell Brown, Professor of Political Science, Auburn University
Kathleen Hale, Professor of Political Science, Auburn University

Election officials must work in a difficult intergovernmental environment of constant change and intense partisanship. Voting practices and funding vary from state to state, and multiple government agencies, the judicial system, voting equipment vendors, nonprofit groups and citizen activists also influence practices and limit change. Despite real challenges and pessimistic media assessments, Hale and Brown demonstrate that election officials are largely successful in their work to facilitate, protect and evolve the voting process. Listen to this BookTalk and learn more about this important administrative work.

For those interested in purchasing the book, click here to find it on the Georgetown University Press website; enter promo code TETL for a 30% discount on all titles.


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Performance Management in a Changing Environment: COVID-19, Online Teaching and the Rise of Data Science

September 23, 2020
In Partnership with the Center for Accountability and Performance
Maria Aristigueta, Moderator, Dean, Biden School of Public Policy and Administration, University of Delaware
Gregory Dobler, Assistant Professor, Biden School of Public Policy and Administration, Data Science Institute, University of Delaware
Alfred Tat-Kei Ho, Professor, School of Public Affairs & Administration, University of Kansas
Gary Vanlandingham, Professor, MPA Director and Reubin O'D. Askew Senior Practitioner in Residence, Florida State University

One important element within public administration is performance management—and COVID is testing our abilities to implement this part of our field. This webinar explored how a pandemic, or similar disruptions within the field, interferes with performance management, data science and the fundamentals of the magic behind public administration. Our panelists dug into examples of how this is playing out across the discipline—within both practitioner studies as well as academic research. Join us to hear from our panelists and learn how we can combat these disruptions to ensure our science stays sound.


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BookTalk: Reforming and Improving Government with Policy Knowledge

September 16, 2020
Steven Putansu, Professorial Lecturer, American University

A central quest of public administration theory and practice is incorporating scientific principles to create a more effective, efficient and equitable government. Despite vast troves of data, information and evidence produced within and outside of government, this knowledge often is ignored by decisionmakers. In Confronting the Evidence-Based Proverb, Steven Putansu argues that reliance on unrealistic promises of policy knowledge are a major contributor to its failure to influence decisions.


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BookTalk: The Divided States of America

September 1, 2020
Don Kettl, Professor, University of Texas—Austin, LBJ School
Bill Shields, Jr., Moderator, Executive Director, ASPA

Federalism was James Madison’s great invention. An innovative system of power sharing that balanced national and state interests, federalism was the pragmatic compromise that brought the colonies together to form the United States. Yet, even beyond the question of slavery, inequality was built into the system because federalism. by its very nature, meant that many aspects of an American’s life depended on where they lived. Over time, these inequalities have created vast divisions between the states and made federalism fundamentally unstable. In The Divided States of America, Don Kettl chronicles the history of a political system that once united the nation—and now threatens to break it apart. Listen in to this insightful discussion and learn more about federalism's impact on inequality in the United States.


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University Research Centers: Powerful Tools in the Fight for Informed Policymaking

August 25, 2020
Maria Aristigueta, Dean, Joseph R. Biden, Jr. School for Public Affairs and Administration, University of Delaware
Dallas Breen, Discussant, President, CUPSO and Director, Stennis Institute, University of Mississippi
Josie Gatti Shafer, Director, Center for Public Administration Research, University of Nebraska at Omaha
Kendra Stewart, Moderator, ASPA President and Professor and Director, Riley Center for Livable Communities, College of Charleston
Andrea Whitsett, Director, Morrison Institute for Public Policy, Arizona State University

University research centers are the backbone of the objective, data driven and nonpartisan research on which policymakers depend to make decisions and craft policy. Addressing vexing subjects like GIS technology, population density, youth homelessness, urban infrastructure and waterway concerns, university-based research teams provide the information that state and local governments need to bring about meaningful and positive change. They are a driver in putting theory into practice. The summer edition of PA TIMES magazine looked at 10 research centers and institutes spanning geography, size, budget, project scope, research practice, influence, position within the university hierarchy and more. This webinar will focus on three of them, showing what the research institutes do, why their work matters and how they advance excellence in public service in sustained and tangible ways.


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The Pandemic, the Protests and the Commission: Healing Our Divided Society

August 24, 2020
Brandi Blessett, Associate Professor and Director, MPA Program, University of Cincinnati
Alan Curtis, Founding President and CEO, Eisenhower Foundation

Since the 1968 Kerner Commission, inequality, deep poverty, public school segregation and mass incarceration of people of color all have increased. The coronavirus pandemic has made things worse and the protests against police violence have expressed citizen frustration. Nonetheless, in the last 50 years we have assembled considerable evidence on what works. To scale up an evidence-based policy, the nation still needs what the Kerner Commission called “new will” from the American people. Now is the time to renegotiate the social contract and seize the day, led by a more activist federal public sector.


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BookTalk: Public Performance Budgeting: Principles and Practice

July 9, 2020
Elaine Yi Lu, Professor, Editor and Director, Department of Public Management, City University of New York—John Jay College
Katherine Willoughby, Golembiewski Professor of Public Administration, University of Georgia

Through thorough examination of performance budgeting laws in U.S. state governments, in-depth interviews with state agency practitioners and quantitative survey analysis of agency heads nationwide, this book examines the influence of performance measurement and management in all phases of the budget process. It examines using performance budgeting at the agency level, honing in on a deeper level of organizational structure than has been provided to date. Listen in to hear more from the authors.


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Performance Management During the Pandemic: Why Should Nonprofits Care?

June 30, 2020
Isaac Castillo, Director of Outcomes, Assessment and Learning, Venture Philanthropy Partners
Alnoor Ebrahim, Professor of Management, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and Tisch College of Civic Life, Tufts University
Richard Greene, Moderator, Chair, Center on Accountability and Performance
Julie Russell, Member, Leap Ambassadors Community Support Team
Mary Winkler, Moderator, Founding Member, Leap Ambassadors Community

Over the years, a great deal has been written about the use of performance management in states and localities, but far less attention has been paid to the use of performance data among not-for-profit organizations. This webinar looked at equity considerations for performance measurement and management; performance management from a funder perspective; and the big picture of performance measurement and management in the nonprofit sector.


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COVID-19 and Its Educational and Child Development Consequences

Sponsored by American University
June 11, 2020
Bradley Hardy, Moderator, Associate Professor, American University and Nonresident Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution
Marcus Casey, Assistant Professor, Economics, University of Illinois-Chicago
Seth Gershenson, Associate Professor, School of Public Affairs, American University
Taryn Morrissey , Associate Professor, School of Public Affairs, American University
Carrie Shandra, Associate Professor, Sociology, Stony Brook University

As the public health and economic effects of the COVID-19 outbreak continue, the downstream impact of the sectors related to the economy, from education, to children’s health, will be felt for years to come. As industries that have ground to a halt slowly reopen and markets remain volatile, what does the future hold for policy decisions in a variety of areas and what will the resulting policy trade-offs look like? This panel discussed these questions and more.


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Organizational Change in an Urban Police Department: Innovating to Reform

June 10, 2020
Brenda J. Bond-Fortier, Author and Associate Professor, Sawyer Business School, Suffolk University
James J. Willis, Moderator, Professor and Chair of Criminology, Law and Society, George Mason University

Policing scholar Brenda J. Bond-Fortier uses longitudinal data to offer a rich account of the complexity of police management and change within one particular mid-sized city. Through a multidisciplinary lens, her research findings provide crucial insight into how and why police organizations respond to a changing environment, set certain goals and change to achieve those goals. Her book, Organizational Change in an Urban Police Department: Innovating to Reform, describes the changes that enabled the Lowell, Massachusetts Police Department to achieve national model status, and builds a nexus between influencing forces, interdisciplinary theory and the creation of an adaptive 21st century police organization.


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COVID-19 and the Social Safety Net

Sponsored by American University
June 4, 2020
Bradley Hardy, Moderator, Associate Professor, American University and Nonresident Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution
Roger Hartley, Associate Professor, Columbia School of Social Work
Tracy Gordon, Senior Fellow, Tax Policy Center, Urban Institute
Elain Maag, Principal Research Associate, Tax Policy Center, Urban Institute
Valerie Wilson, Director, Program on Race, Ethnicity and the Economy, Economic Policy Institute

As the COVID-19 pandemic unfolds, the public health crisis has effectively shut down full sectors of the economy. Hospitality, food and beverage, events, entertainment, transportation and travel have ground to a halt, leaving millions of people without employment and, as a result, turning to safety net benefit programs like SNAP (also known as food stamps) in record numbers. What does this mean for state and federal budgets? What will this unprecedented situation mean for the future of the social safety net? This webinar looked at these questions and more.


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BookTalk: Public Service and Good Governance in the 21st Century

June 3, 2020
Sheila Bair, Former Chair, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Angela Evans, Dean, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin
Donald Kettl, Sid Richardson Professor, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas at Austin
James L. Perry, Moderator, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Paul H. O’Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University, Bloomington

Public Service and Good Governance for the 21st Century, the latest title by James Perry, focuses on two big ideas. The first is that America's governance system is broken and our capacity for effective governance is diminishing. The second is that a spirit of reform is ingrained in American political culture and citizen expectations for change are rising. This webinar engaged in this critical discussion.


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Achieving Social Equity: From Problems to Solutions

May 13, 2020
Mary Guy, Professor of Public Administration, University of Colorado Denver
Sean McCandless, Assistant Professor and Associate Director, Doctorate in Public Administration Program, University of Illinois—Springfield

This BookTalk explored the issues on which Achieving Social Equity: From Problems to Solutions focuses, looking specifically at considerations public administrators should have in mind to truly advance social equity in their communities. Listen in for this fascinating examination.


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Performance Management for EMS—Now More Than Ever

May 12, 2020
Patria de Lancer Julnes, Associate Dean of Academic Programs and Professor, Marxe School of Public & International Affairs, Baruch College, CUNY
Nick Nudell, PhD Student and architect/project manager, EMS Compass
Michael Redlener, Interim President, NEMSQA

This webinar took a close look at Emergency Medical Services. EMS provides a valuable public service responding to medical emergencies, providing timely assessment, treatment including critical care interventions, and in many cases, transport to the hospital. The traditional measure of success has been based solely on response time. However, experts in emergency care and medicine propose there are more meaningful ways to think about what value this service provides to our communities. Listen in on this important discussion.


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COVID-19 - Doing the Public Good in a Time of Crisis: Perspectives from the Front Lines

April 30, 2020 Susan T. Gooden, Moderator, Dean and Professor, L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University
Norton Bonaparte, City Manager, Sanford, Florida
Michael Jacobson, Deputy, Community Mitigation and Recovery Branch Health and Medical Area Command - COVID-19 Response, King County, Washington
Carrie Mathes, Procurement Manager, Orange County Government, Orange County, Florida

Dedicated professionals—at every level of government, both in the United States and around the world—are redefining what it means to serve the public good during the unprecedented crisis that COVID-19 has created. This webinar provided a firsthand account of the strategies, challenges, victories and lessons that define these public servants’ critical work. Presenters focused on state and local government, covering a breadth of topics, ranging from community health to procurement of goods and services, from public safety to intergovernmental coordination.


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Leveraging Behavioral Science to Improve Program Performance

April 29, 2020
John Kamensky, Moderator, Senior Fellow, The IBM Center for The Business of Government
Don Moynihan, McCourt Chair, McCourt School of Public Policy, Georgetown University
Gregg Van Ryzin, Professor, School of Public Affairs and Administration, Rutgers University

A revolution in the measurement and reporting of government performance—in the form of published metrics, report cards, league tables, and rankings—has swept the globe. However, insights from a second revolution, in behavioral science, suggest that people exhibit a set of cognitive limitations and biases that shape their interpretation and use of metrics. As a result, policymakers often find that implementation can go awry and lead to unintended consequences. This event revealed how people interpret and make sense of government performance metrics.


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Performance Measurement for Managing Local Government

April 23, 2020
David Ammons, University of North Carolina

Out of their desire to move ahead with performance management—the use of performance information for management purposes—managers, analysts and students sometimes skip too quickly through the intricacies of good performance measurement. In Performance Measurement for Managing Local Government, David Ammons describes the ins and outs of performance measurement, guides readers toward proper design of measures, illustrates common errors and ways to avoid them, offers tips and even provides sets of suitable measures on which to build.


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COVID-19: Effective Leadership in a Time of Crisis

April 22, 2020
Susan Gooden, Wilder School, Virginia Commonwealth University
Laura Bloomberg, Humphrey School, University of Minnesota
James Burke, Performance Management Group, Virginia Commonwealth University
Michael Massiah, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

This discussion looked at effective leadership skills, tools and insights that matter at all times, but matter more during times of crisis, such as dealing with the coronavirus.

Click here to view the PowerPoint slides from this presentation.


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Inspired to Serve: Recommendations for the Future of Public Service

April 21, 2020
Dr. Joseph Heck, Chairman, National Commission on Military, National and Public Service
Bill Shields, Jr., Moderator, Executive Director, American Society for Public Service

This discussion featured Commission Chairman and former Congressman Joseph Heck, who discussed the Commission’s recent report, Inspired to Serve, and the recommendations it put forward to Congress to address the challenges that face those entering public service today.

Click here to view the PowerPoint slides from this presentation.


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Acceptable Losses - COVID-19: Social Equity and the African American Community

April 16, 2020
Susan T. Gooden, Moderator, Dean, Dean and Professor, L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs, Virginia Commonwealth University
Curtis Brown, Co-Founder and COO, Institute for Diversity and Inclusion in Emergency Management
William Spriggs, Chief Economist, AFL-CIO

This discussion looked at the alarming rate of deaths among the African-American population due to the coronavirus and the policies, processes and systems that need to be corrected to address this calamity.

Click here to read a follow-up article from VCU about this webinar and click here to view the slides that were a part of this discussion.

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U.S. Inspectors General: Truth Tellers in Turbulent Times

March 12, 2020
Charlie Johnson, Texas A&M University
John Kamensky, Moderator, The IBM Center for The Business of Government
Kathy Newcomer, The George Washington University

U.S. Inspectors General: Truth Tellers in Turbulent Times looks at how officials reporting to both executive officials and congressional representatives work to keep the government honest, efficient and effective.

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Making Government Work

January 9, 2020
Katherine Barrett, Barrett and Greene
Richard Greene, Barrett and Greene
Scott Pattison, Moderator

Katherine Barrett and Richard Greene hosted this discussion, looking at their new book, Making Government Work: The Promises and Pitfalls of Performance-Informed Management. Loaded with dozens of timely stories, describing both successes and failures. along with practical steps taken by practitioners to make government work better, this book is a must-read for the new year.

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